connorgarvey7:00 pm (Counting House)
Celebrate our 50th Anniversary with our new museum exhibit opening and folk-rock singer-songwriter Connor Garvey. With a rhythmic guitar and unique clear voice, Connor's songs challenge us to hope, grow, laugh & see all the beauty in life's metaphors. For OBHS members - new members are welcome.

7:00 pm - (South Berwick Public Library)

The Biddeford Mills Museum will be visiting the South Berwick Public Library to present a program called “The Mill Girls,” which intertwines historical fact with real life experience. The presentation is co-sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society.

“The Mill Girls” lecture will be given by former textile mill workers. The lecture will start with a brief historical background covering the industrial revolution, and Frances Cabot Lowell and the Lowell Mills circa 1825. The presentation will discuss the establishment of the Biddeford Mills by Samuel Bachelder from the Lowell Mills, the first mill operatives, the New England farm girls, the boarding houses that were required to housed and protect these young ladies, the reasons the girls left the farms for the Mills, the work conditions, and life in the big city.

mainescivilwarmonuments7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)
From Kittery to Ashland and from Bethel to Eastport, Maine has 175 Civil War monuments commemorating the sacrifices of the state's men and women to preserve the Union between 1861 and 1865. Earle G. Shettleworth, Jr., Maine State Historian, will present the fascinating story of these tangible expressions of patriotism during the four-year conflict that divided the nation.

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)
In the 1870s, the young Theodore Roosevelt made several trips to the Maine woods - and his life was changed forever. Author Andrew Vietze will discuss those adventures, the formative relationship TR forged with legendary guide Bill Sewall, and why they still matter today.

Four American Stories


1:00 pm (Counting House Museum)
Workshop by author Joe Hardy with genealogist Beth Tykodi.
*Special offer for OBHS members -- new members always welcome

A special workshop will be held on the second floor of the Counting House Museum on Sunday, March 4 at 1:00 pm.

The event is free for members of the Old Berwick Historical Society, and new members are welcome to join at the door. A one-year membership donation is $20 per person or $30 for a family. 

CopleyPastel7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)
In this lecture, art historian Deborah M. Child will retrace the journey of this dazzling circa 1770 pastel from the auction house salesroom of Sotheby's in New York back to California and finally to the Boston studio of John Singleton Copley.

9:30am -  Led by Old Berwick Historical Society volunteer Ernie Wood. Meet at the corner of Liberty & Vine Streets, and take a stroll down Vine Street to Leigh’s Mill Pond, learning the history of the street along the way. Sponsored by D.F. Richard Energy

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy Arts Center)

Recent archaeological excavations have recovered the first intact sections of the early-17th-century Plymouth Colony settlement in downtown Plymouth, Massachusetts. Early deposits include large numbers of Wampanoag artifacts alongside the colonial materials. Dr. David Landon describes the search for the early settlement and provides an overview of the new discoveries, with a focus on the Native pottery and English trade goods, to illustrate patterns of cultural interaction. READ MORE


7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)
Meet Mary: ocean-born and named by an infamous pirate. Her birth saved a group of Scottish immigrants aboard a ship bound for New England in 1720. Join historian Jeremy D'Entremont as he separates the facts from the fantastic legends shrouding one of New England's most enduring folk tales.

1:00 pm - South end of Vine Street 


The resting place of a local militia captain whose gravestone was recently discovered will be one of those visited on the Old Berwick Historical Society’s upcoming "Tour of Old Fields Burying Ground." Capt. Ichabod Goodwin died in 1777.

Old Fields Burying Ground is located near the corner of Vine and Brattle Streets. South Berwick’s oldest community cemetery, dating to the 1600s, is part of the “Old Fields” area that was once the center of town.  A meetinghouse stood nearby, and many people earned their livelihood at sawmills on the Great Works River and shipyards on the Salmon Falls River. 

The cemetery tour will last approximately an hour.  It is open to the public and is free of charge.  Comfortable shoes are recommended.  Sponsored by D.F. Richard Energy

Read more here about Old Fields Burying Ground.

 7:30 pm (Berwick Academy Arts Center)

Reliable drinking sources, liquid sustenance, and promoters of sociability, beer and ale played an important role in early New England. Archaeologists know this through the many artifacts excavated at the Chadbourne Site and elsewhere in the Piscataqua region. Dr. Emerson Baker, Project Scholar for the Forgotten Frontier project, will discuss these finds and their significance. He will also describe his efforts with Portsmouth’s Earth Eagle Brewings to recreate colonial ales from historical recipes. READ MORE

My Sales Alive aint he big7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)
Old Bet the elephant toured the Maine frontier during the frigid year of 1816 - Maine's Year Without Summer - until her trail's end in Alfred. Bruce Tucker will present the details of Maine's only successful elephant hunt and the consequences of this sad affair.

Drawing by Marcia Oakes Woodbury of South Berwick

7:00 pm - South Berwick Public Library

Historian Patricia Q. Wall will discuss startling new information from her new book, Lives of Consequence: Blacks in Early Kittery and Berwick in the Massachusetts Province of Maine. Based on careful research conducted over many years, this book presents the first detailed look at the lives of more than four hundred Black individuals who lived in Kittery and Berwick, Maine, from the seventeenth century until about 1820. Pat has patiently combed the available public and private documents to find whatever scraps of information had been recorded about these African Americans. Because most lived their lives in the shadows of the historical record, much has been lost. As Pat reveals, however, in addition to the personal trajectories of their own lives, they also played important roles in the life of their towns. Thanks to her research, we have a much better understanding of the importance of the Black, Native American, and mixed-race populations in southern Maine, both in qualitative and quantitative terms. Copies of Lives of Consequence are available at the Counting House Museum. READ MORE

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