1:00 - 4:00 pm. Old Berwick Historical Society curator Nina Maurer will explore the devastating and heroic events of the Salmon Falls raid of 1690, the pivotal standoff at Worster Brook, and the alliances that shaped a region. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the October 26 OBHS lecture about the northern front of King Philip’s War in Wabanaki country. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. Photo by Brenna Crothers.

rev tompson7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

Seth Hurd will discuss the founding of Berwick Academy and how many members of the Berwick community, including Reverend John Tompson, enthusiastically embraced the need to further the education of the youth in their growing town.

frost tankard7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

Historian Barbara Ward will discuss the characteristics and history of early New England church silver including the collection held by South Berwick's First Parish Federated Church.

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

  During some of the coldest decades of the Little Ice Age, Wabanakis and English colonists traveled along snowshoe routes connecting the Piscataqua region to a wider winter world. Diplomatic envoys, raiding parties, captives, and military patrols journeyed along customary paths that Wabanakis used in peacetime to visit kin and access seasonal subsistence sites. Dr. Thomas Wickman discusses Wabanaki knowledge of the region’s diverse winter ecology and English settlers’ evolving sense of place. Photo credit: Hudson Museum, University of Maine

colonial gun7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

In a talk celebrating the Berwicks’ 300th anniversary this year, blacksmith/gunsmith Steve Woodman will describe the perpetual shortage of firearms in Colonial Maine, the men who tried to alleviate the shortage, and the methods they used.

  10:00-11:30 am. Archaeologist Tad Baker will recount the story of the French and Native raid of 1703 that devastated the village of Wells and the century-long contest of faith and allegiance that defined the Piscataqua frontier. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the February 23 OBHS lecture on the captivity of Esther Wheelwright of Wells. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. Photo by Brenna Crothers.

1665 piscataqua map7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

Dr. Emerson Baker will discuss the native inhabitants of Southern Maine, the Wabanaki people.  Peaceful and violent interactions with European explorers and settlers drastically changed their lives in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

The highs and the lows of the relationships between Native Americans and European settlers of this area will be the subject of a lecture 7:30  pm Thursday, Jan. 24 sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society.  The lecture will be at Berwick Academy's Jeppesen Science Center on Academy Street. The public is invited and refreshments will be served. 

neilldepaoli7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

Much of Maine was wracked by Anglo-Indian conflict from 1675 until the late 1720s, which devastated the region’s Native American and English communities. Berwick was caught in the middle of this inter-cultural warfare. On the evening of November 15th, Dr. Neill De Paoli will lead the audience on a historical and archaeological journey into the impact this warfare had on the makeup, layout, and dynamics of old Berwick. His research has revealed a community under considerable economic, social, and psychological stress as the settlement responded to Native American attacks on this and other settlements in Maine and New Hampshire. 

1960s dance logo7:30 pm  -  American Legion, Rollinsford, NH
 
Celebrate Our 50th Anniversary. Good vibrations for all at this special fundraiser!
 

Click here for more information including event tickets and auction items.

KateFurbish7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

A century ago, a woman doing solitary fieldwork throughout Maine discovered the slender blue flag, Iris prismatica, which exists today only in Wells. This was just one of more than 1000 plants found and painted in watercolors by Catherine Furbish as she did her work from York to Aroostook counties.

Nancy Wetzel of South Berwick will give a talk 7:30 pm Thursday, Oct. 25, about the life of Furbish, a dedicated botanist, scientific artist and founding member of Maine's Josselyn Botanical Society. The free talk, sponsored by the Old Berwick Historical Society, will be at Berwick Academy's Jeppesen Science Center on Academy Street. The public is invited and refreshments will be served.

Photo credit as requested by Bowdoin College Library:
Courtesy the Kate Furbish Collection, Bowdoin College Library, Brunswick, Maine.

oldfields-ngerrish1:00 pm (Old Fields Cemetery)

Led by Dr. Neill De Paoli and Wendy Pirsig, the event initiates a year-long series of programs commemorating the 300th anniversary of the old town of Berwick (comprising present-day Berwick, South Berwick and North Berwick) in 1713.   
Old Fields Burying Ground is located near the corner of Vine and Brattle Streets. The cemetery tour begins at 1:00 pm, rain or shine, and will last approximately an hour.  It is open to the public and is free of charge.  Comfortable shoes are recommended.
South Berwick’s oldest community cemetery, dating to the 1600s, is part of the “Old Fields” area that was once the center of town.  A meetinghouse stood nearby, and many people earned their livelihood at sawmills on the Great Works River and shipyards on the Salmon Falls River. 

abrahamlincoln7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

Brad Fletcher examines the state's role in, and response to, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation freeing the slaves.

Maine’s mixed reaction to the North vs. South conflict over slavery will be the subject of a talk 7:30  pm Thursday, Sept. 27 at Berwick Academy's Jeppesen Science Center on Academy Street.

The free talk by Brad Fletcher falls five days after the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, announcing the end of slavery in the rebellious south to take effect Jan. 1, 1863.

villagevoicesthetour

A one-hour walking tour following the “village voices” of the past will be offered by the Old Berwick Historical Society on Saturday, June 9. 
 
Led by historical society member Wendy Pirsig, the walking tour begins at 1:00 pm in the post office parking lot on Main Street.  The event is free and everyone is welcome.

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