7:30 pm (Berwick Academy Arts Center)

Presenting compelling findings from a three-year of excavation at the Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford, MA, home to the largest slave-holding family in the colony, Dr. Alexandra Chan will examine the role of material culture, architecture, and landscape in complementing and enhancing traditional documentary histories about what it was like to be black and enslaved in colonial New England, as well as discuss the nature of Master-Slave relationships at this site.  READ MORE

10:00 - 11:30 am  (Negutaquet Conservation Area, North Berwick)

EamesHistorian Steven Eames will discuss the militia of northern New England, its origins with the provincial government, and the turn of tide 1774 when the militia found itself turning against the provincial government. The property is home to approximately 2 miles of trail systems and features trail highlights such as the “Double Oak”, a small riverside cemetery including a revolutionary war gravesite, beaver habitat, and meadows along with forested land. Presented through a partnership with the Great Works Regional Land Trust.  Limited to 25 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates.

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy Arts Center)

Historian Peter Michaud will examine the architectural impact of French Canadian immigration over three generations. Beginning with Thomas Plant, whose father immigrated from Quebec to Maine in the 1830s, and the creation of his shoe factory and his estate Lucknow, to the work of local architect Lucien Omer Geoffrion who worked in the greater Portsmouth area from the 1930s to 1970, Michaud will discuss the buildings and landscapes created by French Canadian immigrants and their reflection of popular social trends.

John Gray
John Gray of South Berwick

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy Arts Center)

George Gray, born in Scotland, fought the English in the battle of Dunbar in 1650. After the battle, some of the Scottish prisoners were sold into indentured servitude to English possessions, including the English Colonies. George Gray was sent to Maine. John Demos, an archivist for the Counting House Museum, will present a talk on researching a line of the Gray family of South Berwick. Learn about the discovery of a 17th-century Scottish homestead location and a 19th-century sawmill site. READ MORE

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy Arts Center)

Picturing Maine  In this richly illustrated lecture, Dr. Libby Bischof will discuss the role of the photograph  in understanding Maine  history between 1840 and 1940. Particular attention will be paid to photographs of labor, the role women photographers played in documenting and preserving the landscape and inhabitants of Maine, and the ways in which photographs help us to see that which can no longer be seen. READ MORE

7:00 pm  (Counting House Museum)

Cormac McCarthy Celebrate the new exhibits "Our Stories: Life in Tatnic" and "Brave New World: The Wireless Age Begins," and stay for a fun evening of songs presented by award-winning folk singer and songwriter Cormac McCarthy. For Old Berwick Historical Society members; new members are welcome.

Oldfields Road barn7:30 pm  (Berwick Academy Commons Dining Hall)

The evolution of barn architecture tells the story of New England agriculture. Barns changed from the early English style, to Yankee style, to gambrel and then to pole barns to accommodate changing agriculture. In this presentation, author John Porter will present a chronological walk through time, with photo illustrations of barns from around the state of New Hampshire as examples of these eras of agricultural history. READ MORE

Bischof, Stanley Museum

Chansonetta Stanley Emmons, The Coming of Mechanization, 1906. Courtesy of the Stanley Museum

On Thursday, February 28, 2019, historian Dr. Elizabeth (Libby) Bischof will discuss the role of the photograph in understanding Maine history between 1840 and 1940. The lecture is hosted by the Old Berwick Historical Society and begins at 7:30 p.m. in the Arts Center at Berwick Academy in South Berwick. Admission is free and open to the public. Donations are gratefully accepted.

In this richly illustrated lecture, Bischof will pay particular attention to photographs of labor, the role women photographers played in documenting and preserving the landscape and inhabitants of Maine, and the ways in which photographs help us to see that which can no longer be seen.

Bischof is the Executive Director of the Osher Map Library and the Smith Center for Cartographic Education at the University of Southern Maine, as well as Professor of History. She is the co-author, with Earle Shettleworth and Susan Danly, of Maine Photography: A History, 1840-2015. Bischof received her Ph.D. in History at Boston College.

The Counting House Museum is currently closed for the season, though appointments can be requested. The museum is open June - October on Saturdays and Sundays from 1pm - 4pm. The Old Berwick Historical Society’s 2019 lectures are generously sponsored by Kennebunk Savings and supported by historical society members and donors.

 

Hobbs House

Sat. Mar. 30 - History Hike: Lover's Brook Farm

Pond Road, South Berwick -

10:00 - 11:30 am

OBHS historian Wendy Pirsig will lead a walk along the preserved section of Pond Road that was once the main highway for travelers by horse and foot. Come stroll past the Hobbs House, the historic home on Lover’s Brook Farm, and discover a lost intersection on the old Portland Turnpike.  Imagine your stagecoach pulling up to a nearby tavern with hungry, weary passengers. The brook was the site of an Indian attack in 1724. In 1785 a Thompson Tavern stood nearby.

Presented through a partnership with the Great Works Regional Land Trust. For more information on the hike site, visit www.gwrlt.org. Space on hikes is limited to 25 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates.

Oldfields Road barn   7:30 pm  (Berwick Academy Commons Dining Hall)

  The evolution of barn architecture tells the story of New England agriculture. Barns changed from the early English style, to Yankee style, to gambrel and then to pole barns to accommodate changing agriculture. In this presentation, author John Porter will present a chronological walk through time, with photo illustrations of barns from around the state of New Hampshire as examples of these eras of agricultural history.

Subcategories

Old Berwick Historical Society - Historical Programs for the public

The Old Berwick Historical Society of South Berwick, Maine, invites you to join us for our history lectures and activities.  For programs at Berwick Academy, we meet in the Arts Center. Please take Fogg Entrance #2 and use the parking lot at the top of the hill.  For more information, please write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

JSN Epic template designed by JoomlaShine.com