(7:30pm - Berwick Academy - Whipple Arts Center)

A scholar investigating the centuries-old mystery surrounding the last resting place of captive Scottish will visit a region in America where some of their comrades were taken after the brutal Battle of Dunbar in 1650.

 Dr. Chris Gerrard, head of the department of archaeology at Durham University, England, will present a lecture on the fate of 17th century soldiers imprisoned at Durham.

These men had been caught in a religious war that catapulted them across Europe and America—including southeastern Maine and Seacoast New Hampshire, where many descendants live today. 

Photo: Dr. Andrew Millard, Durham University, North News and Pictures

Sunday, October 30 - Cemetery Art and Symbolism

Authors Paulette Chernack and Cassandra Davidson will present “Cemetery Art and Symbolism- A Talk and Workshop” at the Counting House Museum on Sunday, October 30, at 1:30 pm.   

The program is one of several of the Old Berwick Historical Society’s presentations this fall. Admission is by donation and the public is invited.

The author and the illustrator, a mother/daughter duo, will discuss art, symbolism and history found in graveyards and cemeteries, conservation and preservation information, and correct procedures for rubbing gravestones.

 Local chef Kathy Gunst will host a recipe swap, and talk about her newest book, Soup Swap: Comforting Recipes to Make and Share, on Sunday, December 4, at 2:00 pm at the Counting House Museum. 

Participants are encouraged to bring copies of their favorite recipe for others to take home and try.

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

 The Piscataqua estuary is at the heart of this tale, which asks listeners to imagine how different peoples have lived in the ecosystem we now call home. Prior to the arrival of the English and French during the Little Ice Age, Wabanaki inhabitants mastered the seasonal challenges of living in this place. English settlers redefined its ecology during the seventeenth century. Paying attention to forests, fish, ships, and sheep, Dr. Jeffrey Bolster recasts our regional story, anchoring us to the past in compelling new ways.

 10:00 - 11:30 am. Old Berwick Historical Society president Wendy Pirsig will introduce the story of English merchants and adventurers who settled along the Piscataqua River in the 1600s and launched America’s first clearcut. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the January 26 OBHS lecture on the Piscataqua Estuary before the arrival of Europeans. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. 

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

 The incredible tale of a young girl captured in Wells, Maine, and taken to Canada in 1703, never to return, will be presented by author Dr. Ann Little at our monthly lecture at the Berwick Academy Arts Center. “The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright: Communities in the Northeast Borderlands” is open to the public. Admission is free with donations are gratefully accepted.  

Born and raised to age 7, Esther Wheelwright (1696-1780) was captured by the Wabanaki and taught to live as a native girl. Enrolled in a convent school in Quebec City at age 12, she eventually became Mother Superior of the Ursuline order. 

  10:00-11:30 am. Archaeologist Tad Baker will recount the story of the French and Native raid of 1703 that devastated the village of Wells and the century-long contest of faith and allegiance that defined the Piscataqua frontier. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the February 23 OBHS lecture on the captivity of Esther Wheelwright of Wells. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. Photo by Brenna Crothers.

7:30 pm - (Berwick Academy)

An era when news in New England was carried through both Native American and English networks, and rumors could produce shivers of fear, will be the subject of a talk presented by the Old Berwick Historical Society. Dr. Katherine Grandjean will discuss her recent book, American Passage, which revisits the story of early New England’s settlement through the dark, confused world of communication. Image courtesy Rhode Island Historical Society.

 10:00 am - noon. Historian Neill DePaoli will describe the pivotal role of the beaver fur trade at Newichawannock and the influence of English trade on Wabanaki culture in the 1600s. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the March 23 OBHS lecture on Native and English communications networks in the 1600s. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. Photo by Brenna Crothers.

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

 Both English and French colonists on the Atlantic coast of North America described bread as the “staff of life” and went to considerable lengths to ensure themselves a steady supply. Food historian Paula Marcoux describes how early colonists adapted their technologies, and ultimately their expectations, to local conditions. Her research combines evidence from the archeological and historical record with experimental oven building and baking trials. Samples of period bread and pastry will be served!

1:00 pm - Counting House Museum

 Local Author Paula Bennett will be discussing her recently published book, “Imagining Ichabod: My Journey into 18th Century America through History, Food, and a Georgian House,” at the Counting House Museum in South Berwick.

The book, priced at $30, is hardcover with 60 full-color photographs and 25 adapted historic recipes. ORDER THE BOOK.

Bennett will share her story about how she and her husband, Harvey, came to own the Goodwin House, located in what is called the Old Fields part of South Berwick. They wanted to imagine, and to live to some extent, what daily life was like for the Goodwins in the 1700’s. They researched and explored the diet, décor, and activities of the early colonial times. 

(Counting House Park)

 David Ledoyen and the company of “Les Mousquets du Roi,” French militia re-enactors from Montreal, Quebec, along with Ken Hamilton, a Penobscot interpreter from Corinth, Maine, will bring to life the world of allies and combatants on the Piscataqua frontier in the late 1600s. See the conflict through enemy eyes by visiting the English camp at nearby Wentworth House, sponsored by the Association for Rollinsford Culture and History.

Both encampments are family-friendly, and visitors are encouraged to ask and touch. “Through Enemy Eyes,” a special presentation about the experience of woodsmen raiders on the New England frontier, will take place at 3:00 pm at the Counting House Museum. Photo credit: Jimmy Brodie 

Subcategories

Old Berwick Historical Society - Historical Programs for the public

The Old Berwick Historical Society of South Berwick, Maine, invites you to join us for our history lectures and activities.  For programs at Berwick Academy, we meet in the Arts Center. Please take Fogg Entrance #2 and use the parking lot at the top of the hill.  For more information, please write This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

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