7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

 Perched on the edge of the English Atlantic empire, New England’s people and economy were intertwined with the wider English Caribbean world. At the center of it all were the enslaved people—Africans and Indians—who worked in thousands of English homes and farms. Dr. Linford Fisher grapples with the meaning of such cultural interactions, the realities of slavery, and the connections between New England and a wider Atlantic world of trade, culture, and commerce. READ MOREPhoto credit: John Carter Brown Library

7:30 pm - Counting House Museum

Lecture by Birgitta Ingemanson, Professor Emerita of Russian Studies.  Her book, The Sunny Neighborhood: A Vladivostok Tale, tells the story of Eleanor Lord Pray, a newlywed from Berwick transplanted to the east coast of Russia in 1894, and three decades of cultural adaptation and political upheaval in a foreign port.

7:30 pm (Berwick Academy)

 Abenaki scholar Dr. Lisa Brooks speaks about the northern front of King Philip’s War in Wabanaki country. New maps of “Native space” and littleknown historical documents reveal a very different view of both the war and the territory known as northern New England. Brooks demonstrates that the war did not end with the death of the Wampanoag leader King Philip in 1676, but rather with a process of Native alliance making and treaties between colonial authorities and Wabanaki sachems. Photo credit: Ken Hamilton

 10:00 am - 1:00 pm. Eliot Historical Society president Rosanne Adams will relate the story of Black Will, his rise from slave to landed farmer in 1700, and shifting attitudes toward race in early York County. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the September 28 OBHS lecture on New England slavery and trade. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. Photo by Brenna Crothers.

 1:00 - 4:00 pm. Old Berwick Historical Society curator Nina Maurer will explore the devastating and heroic events of the Salmon Falls raid of 1690, the pivotal standoff at Worster Brook, and the alliances that shaped a region. Presented through a partnership of Old Berwick Historical Society and Great Works Regional Land Trust, this hike follows the October 26 OBHS lecture about the northern front of King Philip’s War in Wabanaki country. For details on hike site, click here. Limited to 20 people and reservations are required. Call GWRLT at 207-646-3604 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information, hike status, and weather updates. Photo by Brenna Crothers.

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Tour South Berwick
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