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Sarah Orne Jewett's South Berwick
15. Fogg Memorial Building, Berwick Academy

Fogg Memorial Building, Berwick AdademyBuilt 1894. This monumental Romanesque Revival hall, which Sarah helped to fund and design, was built with a grant from the estate of William Hayes Fogg, a Berwick native who had made his fortune in the China trade. Sarah asked her friend Sarah Wyman Whitman, the Boston artist who had designed covers for Jewett’s books, to create stained-glass windows for the building. Jewett’s own commission, a dove over a wreath in memory of the Civil War, is the central window on the street-side second fl oor.  Read more...

--From the Sarah Orne Jewett Walking Tour brochure by the Jewett Eastman Memorial Committee, trustees of Jewett Eastman House.

 
16. Counting House Museum, Corner of Route 4 and Liberty Street

Counting House Museum, South Berwick, MaineBuilt c.1830. The Greek Revival counting house was originally the business office for a complex of nineteenth-century mill buildings that stretched along the Salmon Falls River, employing hundreds of workers who made sheeting out of cotton from Southern plantations. Today the building, the only surviving structure of the complex, houses the archives and exhibitions of the Old Berwick Historical Society. It is open weekend afternoons in summer and year round by appointment. Just downriver, near the town’s Counting House Park, was Quamphegan Landing, where fl at-bottomed gundalows carrying goods between South Berwick and Portsmouth once docked, and where Sarah would set out for solitary boating explorations of the river.  Read more...

--From the Sarah Orne Jewett Walking Tour brochure by the Jewett Eastman Memorial Committee, trustees of Jewett Eastman House.

 
17. Hamilton House, 40 Vaughan’s Lane

Built c. 1785. When Sarah’s grandfather and great uncle ran their shipbuilding business at Pipe Stave Landing below the Hamilton House, this stretch of the Salmon Falls was a center of maritime industry. But by the time Jewett convinced her Boston friends Emily and Elise Tyson to buy the house as a summer retreat, the riverfront had grown quiet and the house had fallen into disrepair. The ruins of a wooden wharf, visible at low tide, are all that is left of the Jewett enterprise, but the Tysons splendidly restored the house and garden. Historic New England now maintains the property, opening the gardens from dawn to dusk, year round, and offering guided tours through the house on Wednesday through Sunday, from June 1 to October 15.  Read more...

--From the Sarah Orne Jewett Walking Tour brochure by the Jewett Eastman Memorial Committee, trustees of Jewett Eastman House.

 
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